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This New Netflix Phishing Scam Has No Chill – Don’t Fall For It!

There’s a new scam that’s preying on Netflix users.

The elaborate scam uses fake e-mails that appear to be super official in an attempt to get users to give up their banking information.

Users will receive one of these emails from “Netflix,” which states that there was a problem with their account and that it has been deactivated.

In order to retrieve the account, the scam asks users to provide currently billing information, by clicking a fake Netflix link.

Basically, when you go to the link, you hand over your banking info to strangers.

Reports indicated that the email address being used is: supportnetflix@checkinformation.com.

So far, only the UK has been affected by the scam but it’s only a matter of time before it makes its way to the US.

 

If you receive one of these emails DO NOT CLICK ON THE LINK! 

If you wish to verify issues with your Netflix account, please log in directly through the website.

Netflix has said that they will never ask for personal or banking info in an email. They ask those who receive an email to report it directly to Netflix.

Read their direct statement:

“Phishing is an attempt to acquire your personal information by pretending to represent a website or company you trust online.

Phishers will go to great lengths to try to take over your account or steal your personal information. They may create fake websites that look like Netflix, or send emails that imitate us and ask you for personal information.

Netflix will never ask for any personal information to be sent to us over email. This includes:

  • Payment information (credit card number, debit card number, direct debit account, PIN, etc.).
  • Social security number for US citizens (in any form), identification number, or tax identification number.
  • Your account password.

Netflix may email you to update this information with a link to our website, but be cautious of fake emails that may link to phishing websites. If you’re unsure about a link in an email, you can always hover your cursor over the link to see where it directs in which you can see the real linked web address at the bottom of most browsers.

If you believe you have received a phishing message, visit our Help Center to learn how to report it to us.”

 

 

 

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