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Ariana Grande Brings a ‘Dangerous’ Mix of Unity and Feminism To The United Center

There was no shortage of girl power at Ariana Grande’s “Dangerous Woman” tour.

Opening act Victoria Monet kicked off the night exuding abounding professionalism and promising big things ahead.

Monet, who wrote seven track on Ariana’s album, delivered sultry dance moves, an R&B flow and a striking stage presence.

That presence was also felt during Little Mix’s set as they hit the stage with force and fury.

Singles like “Hair,” “Salute” and “Touch” pumped up the crowds but the real shining moment came when they performed “Secret Love Song,” a sort of LGBT manifesto, to an arena of twinkling cellphones.

The empowerment continued with “Shout Out To My Ex” because there’s nothing better than stunning 4 ladies comfortable in their body that can find joy in their newly single status.

In fact, female empowerment and unity were a theme throughout the night, which is welcoming in a time when people are so keen on pointing out differences and wrongs.

 

Ariana may be petite but she brought a GRANDE tour to the United Center in Chicago!

As the 10-minute countdown started, fans shrieked with anticipation. Ariana, clad in thigh high boots and rocking the perfect thick pony, appeared on stage, commanding every single eye in the room and delivering pop hit after pop hit.

Ariana isn’t your typical pop star though – she deploys her talents onto every single song, making for a “dangerous” mix of sweet and spicy.

Even as she stood there surrounded by her dancers, laser lights, smoke machines, confetti and balloons, she wasn’t overshadowed. The true star of the night was her vocal range and ability to just be herself in a room of people who adored her.

As she walked back and forth on her catwalk, she waved and winked at fans rocking cat ears, a symbol of old Ariana, and those rocking bunny ears, an ode to her latest album art.

The 90-minute set was a celebration of youth as she kicked thing off with “Be Alright” before launching trap jam “Everyday.”

When she slowed things down, she was able to show off her vocal chops and be completely vulnerable and intimate, especially during the magical “Moonlight,” which she sang while kneeling at the end of the catwalk.

As a firm supporter of the LGBT community, she acceptance and to “be yourself” while performing “Thinking of You” in front of a curtain with rainbow colored images of same-sex and straight couples.

She’s not gullible though and knows that fans come for the hits – the addicting eagworms that everyone knows every word to.

Those crowd pleasers included “One Last Time,” “Break Free” and “Bang Bang” although sadly no appearances by Jessie J or Nicki Minaj were scheduled.

Ariana played the balancing act quite well, giving equal attention to the most known chart-hits and the lesser known songs catered more to the die-hard fans that know even the words to the bonus tracks.

“Side to Side” brought the return of her famous bike from the VMAs and she even squeezed in a cycling session during it, which made me regret not going to the gym that evening and drinkingg several margaritas. (They helped me dance okay?)

It all led up to the night’s most provacative moment – her statement piece, “Dangerous Woman”.

The single, which shares the same name as the tour name, encompassed the feminist theme in a neat little packaged.

Empowered. Strong. Ladylike. Ferocious. Sensual. Human. Female.

All words that Ariana tried to exude with her presence, which also flashed on the screen behind her.

After a traumatic fan ecnoutner – “Ariana is sexy as hell, man, I see you hitting that!”- a fan told her boyfriend Mac Miller, she was hoping to encourage the open conversation on feminism, fighting the stigma of objectification and rape culture in a man’s word.

Pipes aside, Ari is proof that you can be sexy and intune with your sexuality without “asking for it.”

And she did it all while strutting the stage in 5 inch heels, exuding confidence and being just as dangerous as she wanted to be.

More from Lizzy Buczak
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